NO REST

"

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

"
Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

(via meheeeen)

— 1 day ago with 35777 notes

estoysuerte:

n i c e   b - o - r - e   g u y  &  b o y o y o  t o u c h   -   b o r e d o m s 

— 1 day ago with 1 note

sexhaver:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

breathe into the BEE ORB to reveal your fate

(via blakmagicwoman)

— 1 day ago with 382174 notes
"The work on social pain [shows] that some of the same neural regions that are involved in physical pain are involved in social pain, [which] can be very validating for people. For anyone who’s felt the pain of losing somebody or who’s felt the hurt feelings that come from being ostracized or bullied, there’s something very validating in seeing this scientific work that shows it’s not just in our head. It is in our head because it’s in our brain. It’s not just in our head, there is something biological going on that’s interpreting the pain of social rejection as something that really is a painful experience."
Fascinating Edge conversation with UCLA social psychologist Naomi Eisenberger. For a poetic testament to this idea, see Shane Koyczan’ s spoken-word masterpiece “To This Day.”  (via explore-blog)
— 1 day ago with 286 notes

hussieologist:

jcoleknowsbest:

hussieologist:

jcoleknowsbest:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

darvinasafo:

Darren Hunt of Utah

The murder of young Black Men by police continues.

oh for fucks SAKE

Y’all he was shot in the back…. HE WAS SHOT IN THE BACK…

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58409680-78/family-hunt-moss-police.html.csp

He was carrying a sword? This mf in my geography class carried a sword to class everyday and when I expressed my discomfort it was dismissed. But this brotha was shot in the back.

and it was a blunted sword.. couldn’t have cut anybody… but white people walking around with loaded rifles in target…

Exactly! This is evil.

(via devon-aoki)

— 1 day ago with 102327 notes
How to Recognize Plant Stress →

mangoestho:

Sometimes when plants look sick or appear to be under attack by insects, the symptoms are actually a sign that the plant is being stressed by environmental factors. Here are some common symptoms of stress and the conditions that cause them.

image

image source [x]

Wilting can indicate insect or disease problems, but is most commonly due to a lack of soil moisture. Don’t assume plants have enough water if the soil surface is moist. Dig down and make sure it is moist to a depth of at least 6″ for most vegetable plants and other annuals. If soil is too dry, water plants thoroughly; they should recover within 24 hours.

— 1 day ago with 234 notes

nowyoukno:

(Sources: 1, 2, 3)  for more facts follow NowYouKno

— 1 day ago with 6324 notes